20 powerful hiplife songs that got Ghana dancing in the last 15 years

Music of Friday, 13 October 2017

Source: yen.com.gh

2017-10-13

Yen Hit Songsplay videoSome of the veteran musicians

The Ghana music industry, especially the Hiplife section, has produced many talents who have released hits after hits over the years.

This is a list of some of the best songs that have been making Ghanaians put on their dancing shoes over the last 15 years From the days of Highlife great, E.T.

Mensah, to the days of Burger Hilife, Ghana has been blessed with top musicians who have dazzled fans with their songs.

But the advent of the new musical genre, Hiplife, brought a new dimension to the Ghanaian musical scene.

There is no doubt that artistes of this genre have dominated the industry ever since. Year after year, these artistes have released tracks which have gone on to become smash hits.

YEN.com.gh has put together a list of such hits which stole the headlines in the last 15 years.

It comes as no surprise that these tunes did well, because Ghanaians love to dance and so gravitate towards Hiplife, a genre whose tunes are danceable by default.

Relax and breeze through our list below:

1. Otoolege – Ofori Amponsah ft K.K. Fosu, Kofi Nti & Barosky:

Ofori Amponsah was a successful musician before this song, having released a collaborative album, ‘Wo ho kyere’ with Daddy Lumba in 1999 and three albums, Asew in 2001, Meprawo in 2002 and Sardine in 2004, but it was this song, the title of his 2005 album, that made him a household name.

Featuring K.K. Fosu, Kofi Nti and rapper, Barosky, the song helped him to win seven awards at the 2006 Ghana Music Awards and established him as one of the greatest artistes in the country.

2. Medo – Lord Kenya ft Swanzy B:

Lord Kenya, in his hey days, was rivaled as the best Hiplife artiste only by Obrafour. Even after ‘being arrested by the Holy Ghost’, he is still considered by many as the greatest Hiplife artiste of all time.

This track, released as part of his 2001 album, Yeesom Sika, could be said to be the very song which propelled him to legend status.

He won four awards at the 2002 Ghana Music Awards on the back of this song, becoming the first rapper in the country to win the most coveted Song of the Year and Artiste of the Year awards.

The song was so popular that its hook, “Chick yi oye bue” became an expression to describe beautiful ladies.

3. Aketesia – Kontihene:

Kontihene burst onto the Hiplife scene with a bang, emerging with the Song of the Year award at the 2003 Ghana Music Awards, with just his first album. Aketesia was the topmost song on the ‘Nyankoton’ album.

The chorus of the song is a popular ‘jama’ song for students in the Akan-speaking areas and it was not surprising that it resonated so well with music-lovers and got them on their feet anytime they heard it being played.

4. Klu Blofo – Buk Bak:

Buk Bak already had released albums with songs like Komi Ke Kena, Chingilingi, Kelewele, Akwasi Broni, among others.

But it was not until they released Sika Kokoo in 2002 that they earned an iconic status. The lead song, though mainly sung in Ga on one of producer, Jay Q’s ‘jama’ beats, it caught on well with the public and was given much air play even in non-Ga speaking areas.

The song helped Buk Bak sweep three awards at the 2003 Ghana Music Awards.

5. Oye Ohene Remix – Obrafour ft Tinny: It is difficult to select the best song of Obrafour but this definitely is one of his best.

It was part of his Ntetee Pa album, which was released in 2004 to support the then Vice President Alhaji Aliu Mahama’s campaign against indiscipline.

The song went on to become a smash hit as Ghanaians could do anything but dance to it when it was played.

It featured Ga rapper, Tinny who did not disappoint. It is the ultimate remix, you know.

6. Ahomka Womu – VIP:

VIP in 2004 became the first group to win the Ghana Music Awards’ Artiste of the Year trophy and it was helped in many ways by this song.

With its danceable Jay Q beat, the song got both the old and the young on their feet and its easy to sing along chorus made it more popular.

7. Tuabodom – Nkasei:

Nkasei struck a very sensitive chord with this one.

The lyrics literally portrayed the people of Tuabodom in the Brong Ahafo region as ‘not enlightened’ and it provoked some controversy.

But despite the negativity surrounding it, many Ghanaians liked the song and they danced to it, helping the duo to become the 2006 Ghana Music Awards Hiplife Artiste of the Year.

8. Fefe ne fe – Tic Tac ft Tony Tetuila:

This song sparked the string of collaborations between Ghanaian and Nigeria musicians and it did not disappoint as Tony Tetuila, the biggest rapper from Nigeria at that time, did his own thing.

Fefenefe was nominated for the 2005 Ghana Music Awards Song of the Year.

9. Konkontibaa – Obour ft Samini (Batman):

Before current MUSIGA president, Bice Osei Kuffour aka Obour became a music administrator, he was a very good musician and this song is a testament.

Coming off the Atumpan album which was released after his near-fatal accident in 2004, the song became popular for controversial reasons. The lyric was deemed profane, though it was not explicit.

The song was only allowed to be part of the 2005 Ghana Music Awards after Obour met a panel convinced them to include it. It went on to win five awards at the event.

10. 16 Years – Mzbel ft Castro:

Mzbel and Castro clicked any time they entered the studio and if this is their biggest work together, then you should know what a hit track it was.

Finding herself in a male-dominated occupation, Mzbel had to give off her best for each song, including this one.

Helped by a nice video accompanying it and the dexterity of Castro, the song became so popular that it still gets many people dancing to it today.

11. Angelina – Praye:

This is one of those songs that you do not really have a full understanding of its lyrics as it has mixed languages but you dance to it anyway.

The beat from Jam Master Jay was on point and the song won the 2009 Ghana Music Awards Song of the Year.

In fact, people liked the song so much that one guy in Kumasi who made a donation at the funeral of his friend’s mother, forgot they were in mourning and requested the DJ play Angelina for them to dance.

12. Woso – Okyeame Kwame:

The Rap Doctor cemented his place in the Hiplife hall of fame in 2009 by winning three awards at the Ghana Music Awards, including the Artiste of the Year .

It was all thanks to ‘Woso’, the smash hit produced by the Richie Mensah of Lynx Entertainment fame.

This is one of the few Hiplife songs which make sense to you and make you dance as well. Also worth mentioning is the fact that this popularised that aspect of rap music call crunk which became very dominant at the time.

13. Swagger -Ruff & Smooth:

Few upcoming artistes get songs that make nationwide impact and even affect the national lexicon.

Such was it for Ruff and Smooth with their song, Swagger, which they released in late 2009.

The fact that the term ‘swag’ became common in everyday language around the time the song came up should tell you how popular the song was.

14. You go kill me – Sarkodie:

Not only was the danceable and popular. It was revolutionary, as it popularised the sort of sub-genre which came to be known as Azonto in the music circles.

And it also won him awards at the 2012 Ghana Music Awards.

15. I Dey Mad – R2Bees:

This song, apart from its nice beat and love theme, which resonated madly with a lot of Ghanaians, it was helped to fame by the controversial ‘sacking’ of Under from the group.

In the song, Under could be heard doing all the rap but for some reason, the group decided to sideline him.

The ensuing controversy propelled the song to the top of the music charts. It was very popular among students, especially.

16. Aha Ayede – Nana Boroo ft SK Blinckz:

This is another one of the controversy-propelled songs.

The singer of the chorus, SK Blinckz claimed at the time of the song’s release that it was his song and not that of Nana Boroo.

The accusations made people curious to listen to the song and with an easy chorus and a party mood theme, it caught on like wildfire. It’s popularity could be likened to the “one corners” of today.

Nana Boroo won the 2011 Ghana Music Awards Song of the Year but has since not had any song which has got even half of the popularity of Aha Ayede.

17. Gimme Blow – Asem:

This song is not your everyday danceable track. With its crunk-like features it was more of a hardcore rap song, but it still got popular with music lovers.

Defying the then normal methods of asking radio DJs to play your songs to get the necessary attention, this song relied on the technology at the time of its release in 2008 – mobile phone bluetooth.

Almost every phone user at the time wanted songs on their phone and it was one of the songs that you ended up getting even if you had not necessarily requested for it.

Helped with somewhat controversial lyrics, the song became popular and launched the careers of both the rapper, Asem, and the producer, Richie Mensah.

18. Simple – Bradez:

Taking a cue from the success their senior brother, Okyeame Kwame achieved by working with Richie Mensah on his Woso track, Bardez also hooked up with him and the result was this masterpiece which became the Song of the Year at the 2010 Ghana Music Awards.

It spawned many covers, including Tie Tie, the track which brought Dadie Opanka into the limelight.

That is the sort of goodwill Simple enjoyed. Simply put, simple was irresistible.

19. Mansa – Bisa K. Dei

This is your typical danceable tune and it was bound to do well.

The 2015 music year was a good one for Bisa and that goodness was founded on this Kaywa-produced track.

From the moment the song was released it enjoyed massive airplay for weeks and was the toast of fans everywhere it was played.

It won the Song of the Year at the 2016 Ghana Music Awards and many believe Bisa should have been named the artiste of the year too.

20. Kotosa – Wutah:

Wutah’s track is what you call a non-stop hit. Any time and anywhere it is played, everybody will jump to their feet.

The song is so good that about a decade after its release, music lovers still enjoy dancing to it.

Peace FM’s Kwame Sefa Kayi loved the song so much that it became the signature tune for his Kokrokoo morning show, as he played it every morning And it transcended borders, with Nigerian singer, Flavour, sampling the song for his Kwarika track.

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