5 times Dolly Parton pushed for acceptance and tolerance of other races, gender, cultures

By Entertainment Reporter Aug 14, 2020

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Legendary country singer Dolly Parton expressed her support of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement.

During her recent interview with Billboard, the multi-award-winning singer said she backs the BLM protesters of the BLM and she’s in full support of the movement.

“I understand people having to make themselves known and felt and seen. And of course, Black lives matter,” said Parton.

Having avoided politics and controversies for many years in the showbiz, she’s decided to speak out.

Slamming those opposing the movement, Parton said: “Do we think our little white asses are the only ones that matter? No!”

She continues: “All these good Christian people that are supposed to be such good Christian people, the last thing we’re supposed to do is to judge one another.

“God is the judge, not us. I just try to be myself. I try to let everybody else be themselves.”

This comes just two years after Parton decided to rename her Dixie Stampede dinner attraction due to the racist connotations of the word “Dixie”.

“There’s such a thing as innocent ignorance, and so many of us are guilty of that,” Parton was quoted at the time.

She added: “When they said ‘Dixie’ was an offensive word, I thought, ‘Well, I don’t want to offend anybody. We’ll just call it the Stampede.’

“As soon as you realise that [something] is a problem, you should fix it. Don’t be a dumb*ss. That’s where my heart is. I would never dream of hurting anybody on purpose.”

“Recognise that attitudes change and feel that by streamlining the names of our shows, it will remove any confusion or concerns about our shows and will help our efforts to expand into new cities.”

In 2017, the American singer got flak for her silence during the controversial Emmys moment when her “9 to 5” co-stars Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda took a jab at Donald Trump.

Although Parton remained silent as her co-stars spoke out, many people criticized her for not defending Trump.

A month after the Emmy, Parton broke her silence stating that she is an entertainer and not a politician.

“I don’t do politics. I’m an entertainer,” she said.

In an interview with Larry King, the icon admitted that she grew up without any black people around but did not in any way make her racist.

“We didn’t know any blacks or Hispanics or any of those people growing up. I grew up way back in the mountains,” Parton shared.

With a career spanning over fifty years, the singer she’s been advocating for “more tolerant and accepting towards people who are different”, through her music.

“We should be a little more tolerant and a little more accepting and understanding of not just the gays, but other people, minorities. We just don’t have enough love to really live in this world, and we really need to,” added Parton, in another interview.

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