Who killed the judges: Freedom is not free; Sosu advises Ghanaians to be responsible

General News of Thursday, 4 October 2018

Source: Myjoyonline.com

2018-10-04

lawyer Francis-Xavier Sosu

Private legal practitioner, Francis-Xavier Sosu, is urging Ghanaians to draw lessons from the murder of three High Court judges and a retired military officer, in order to protect the freedom being enjoyed today.

Mr. Sosu called on Ghanaians to preserve the rule of law in memory of the those who sacrificed their lives for the return to constitutional rule.

“…the least we can do is to protect this freedom we enjoy and give our lives in liberation of others. We must insist on a just society where justice will be done to all manner of persons and injustice to none,” the human rights lawyer said in a Facebook post on Wednesday, a day after Joy News aired the first ever documentary on the murder of the judges.

“Our greatest tribute to our fallen heroes is to preserve the RULE OF LAW,” he added.

On the night of June 30, 1982, news broke that three superior court judges and an ex-military officer had been abducted by unknown men. Initial investigations revealed Justices Kwadwo Adjei Agyepong, Poku Sarkodie and Cecelia Koranteng-Addow were killed.

Later their charred bodies were found miles away from the capital, Accra. The people arrested and executed for the heinous crime – Joachim Amartey Kwei, Lance Corporal Amedeka, Tony Tekpor and Johny Dzandu – said they were carrying out a national assignment.

Commenting on the documentary, Mr. Sosu, who recently spent time at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee, USA to mark eight years since he was called to the Bar, says Ghanaians must “demand fairness in all situations. America is where it is today not by magic. People protested and demanded better conditions of living and better treatment from the ruling class.”

Below is the full post:

LAWYER FRANCIS-XAVIER SOSU writes on Facebook…

Interesting memories of the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis TN.

Fellow Ghanaians, let us not take our freedom for granted. Freedom is not free. Many gave up their lives for the freedom we enjoy today. I watched the JoyNews documentary titled “who killed the judges” and felt more sad.

It may be a multi-million question that may never have answers. Let’s pause as a nation and see what lessons we can draw from our martyrs and heroes of rule of law, in our struggles for independence until our constitutional era.

Instead of opening old wounds the least we can do is to protect this freedom we enjoy and give our lives in liberation of others. We must insist on a just society where justice will be done to all manner of persons and injustice to none. Our greatest tribute to our fallen heroes is preserve the RULE OF LAW.

We must resist tyranny in all forms. We must demand fairness in all situations. America is where it is today not by magic. People protested and demanded better conditions of living and better treatment from the ruling class. People fought against slavery. People fought against discrimination and differential treatment. People fought for educational, voting and economic rights. Men and women went to prison and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr eventually had to die because he wanted to see a just Society.

As professionals in Ghana, whether Lawyers, Judges, Police, Teachers, Doctors, Nurses or media men, we must commit to these values.

Free and advanced societies are not automatic. We must demand and fight for it. Ghana can be great. Dream of a New Ghana.

Like Dr. King Jr., I have a dream; that Ghana will win the war against political corruption and extreme poverty.

I have a dream; that someday, political leadership and politicians will be devoted to Ghana, where the love for country and the people we serve will be greater than political parties and partisanship.

I have a dream; that sharing money for votes which is the bedrock of political corruption will become a crime punishable by imprisonment.

I have a dream; that someday children of school-going age will not be homeless and begging arms on the streets of Accra and the major streets in our towns and cities without any intervention From the State.

I have a dream that both the poor and the vulnerable will have adequate legal aid and representation to avoid manifest injustice.

I have a dream; that this failed political leadership of our nation would give way to a new generation of leaders whose object will be selfless service to the people than selfish personal gains.

I have a dream; that our civil societies including the bar association, religious bodies and our traditional rulers will build a consensus to always put Ghana first before their own interests.

I have a dream; that our individual loyalty shall be to God and country. That we will always stand by truth and we will defend the cause of freedom and liberty and the rule of law without fear or favour

It is a DREAM OF A NEW GHANA.

There is hope for a new Ghana.

It is a continuous struggle. It won’t come easy. The road may be muddy And rough. But we shall overcome.

We shall SURELY overcome.

I feel inspired to continue to STAND FOR JUSTICE, SPEAK FOR JUSTICE and FIGHT FOR JUSTICE.

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