Quake-hit Indonesia asks for help, graves dug for 1,000-plus

“There has been no aid, we need to eat. We don’t have any other choice, we must get food,” one man in Palu told AFP as he filled a basket with goods from a nearby store.

The disaster agency said a tsunami warning system, which might have saved lives, had not worked for six years due to a lack of money.

“Our funding has been going down every year,” agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said.

Many have spent the last days desperately searching for loved ones while dealing with the trauma of the disaster.

One survivor, Adi, was hugging his wife by the beach when the tsunami struck on Friday. He has no idea where she is now, or whether she is alive.

“When the wave came, I lost her,” he said. “I was carried about 50 metres. I couldn’t hold anything,” he said.

Others have centred their search for loved ones around open-air morgues, where the dead lay in the baking sun — waiting to be claimed, waiting to be named.

As dire as the situation in Palu is, it was at least clear. In outlying areas, the fate of thousands is still unknown.

Indonesia’s Metro TV broadcast aerial footage from a coastal community in Donggala, close to the epicentre of the quake. Some waterfront homes appeared crushed but a resident said most people fled to higher ground after the quake struck.

“When it shook really hard, we all ran up into the hills,” a man identified as Iswan told the TV.

Ports, bridges, roads shattered 

Yenni Suryani, of Catholic Relief Services, said devastated infrastructure was hampering rescue efforts.

“Humanitarian groups are struggling to get people into affected areas,” she said. The main airport at Palu was damaged, landslides had cut off key roads while “power is out almost everywhere,” she added.

Satellite imagery provided by regional relief teams showed severe damage at some of the area’s major ports, with large ships tossed on land, quays and bridges trashed and shipping containers thrown around.

A double-arched yellow bridge had collapsed, its ribs twisted as cars bobbed in the water below.

Indonesia, home to 260 million people, is one of the world’s most disaster-prone nations.

It lies on the Pacific “Ring of Fire”, where tectonic plates collide and many of the world’s volcanic eruptions and earthquakes occur.

A massive 2004 quake triggered a tsunami that killed 220,000 throughout the region, including 168,000 in Indonesia.

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