New Gh¢5 note out amidst low sensitisation  

 

 

Nasiru Issahaku is Governor of Ghana’s Central Bank

 

A cross-section of Ghanaians have bemoaned the lack of publicity on the new Gh¢5 that was released by the Bank of Ghana (BoG) yesterday.

According to them, the low advertisement on the new note could bring about chaos and confusion, particularly among traders and transport operators, in the country.

The new Gh¢5  was unveiled by the BoG on Friday, March 3, 2017  as a commemorative note for the “Ghana at 60 years on” anniversary.

The note was yesterday, Tuesday, March 7 2017, circulated to the banks for public usage.

One distinctive feature of the new GH¢5 note is that it has an engraved portrait of Dr. James Kwegyir Aggrey, a missionary and a teacher, who contributed immensely to education in the then Gold Coast.

The note also has tactile markings to assist the visually impaired.  The colour of the GH¢ 5.00 figure at the top left corner of the note, changes colour from green to blue when tilted.

Speaking to Today in an interview, a trader at Kwame Nkrumah Circle, who gave his name as Mr. Yaw Ampaw, although enthused about the new note lamented on the level of awareness created.

His concern was that since there was not enough education on the new currency, most people would end up fighting over its usage whether it is a legal tender.

“It’s good for Ghana to celebrate its 60th anniversary with a new note, but the problem I have is that not enough advertisement was made about the money which can cause confusion,” he said.

He added that with the lack of awareness, some might even consider it as fake if given to them.

“I think that the Bank of Ghana should have done much announcement and proper education on the new GH¢5 note in order to prevent people from producing fake note which will help promote free and fair usage of the money,” Madam Muni, a waakye seller at Avenor, said.

Trotro driver, Moses Ali, pointed out some challenges they are likely to face with passengers regarding the new GH¢5.

According to him, “this will seriously create problems for us and passengers, especially those who do not know anything about the money.”

He added that “some passengers might even refuse to accept the money because they are not even aware that a new note has been introduced.”

Describing the move as a ‘risky one,’ a civil servant, who gave his name as Daniel Okine, called on the Bank of Ghana to, as a matter of agency, ensure that much education is done on the new GH¢5, especially in the markets.

He however, advised that something must be done as soon as possible to prevent the usage of fake notes.

 

 

Story: Evans Obiri Appiah

Comments