Creation of Monitoring and Evaluation Ministry timely – Experts defend

Despite the public backlash received by the president over the creation of the Monitoring and Evaluation Ministry, some experts have justified it.

Executive Director of the Institute for Democratic Governance (IDEG), Dr. Emmanuel Akwetey says the new ministry would bridge the existing gap in the implementation of government policies.

He told Nhyira Addo, host of Joy FM’s Super Morning Show Thursday that the nation has struggled with the implementation of policies because of the absence of an effective monitoring and evaluation system.

“In 2001 there were a lot of complaints that implementation of the Highly Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) and Ghana Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (GPRSP) arrangement was not taking place within the public service,” he said.

IDEG Executive Director, Dr Emmanuel Akwetey

Central University’s Dean of Law Faculty, Professor Ken Attafuah said the new ministry is key to the fulfilment of the promises made by President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo.

The President on Wednesday announced the second batch of ministers-designate to serve in his government if approved by Parliament. The list of 12 nominees add up to the previously announced 13 nominees of the first batch bringing the number to 25 ministers who would be vetted by Parliament’s Appointment Committee.

A notable feature of the second batch of ministerial nominees was the inclusion of two new ministries created by the President. They include the Monitoring and Evaluation Ministry and Regional Re-organisation.

Some Ghanaians have doubted the relevance of the Monitoring and Evaluation Ministry when the task could be performed by some existing ministries.

Criminologist, Professor Ken Attafuah

But the experts who have diverse experience in governance lauded the President’s decision, saying it would end some of the challenges faced in policy implementation.

“Monitoring is a big issue. Apart from that, these days monitoring and evaluation has become an extremely important and separate function,” Dr Akwetey said, adding the country that fails to prioritise the monitoring of its policies would run into difficulties.

On his part, Professor Attafuah said that although Ghana needs an ardent enforcement of its laws, creating new institutions would help in terms of accountability.

 

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