Politics is not a dirty game – Rex Omar


Entertainment of Thursday, 11 February 2016

Source: abrantepa.com

2016-02-11

Rex Omar MahamaRex Omar

Politics in Ghana has been described as a ‘dirty game’ by a section of the populace who believe that anyone who plans to venture in should be ready for the attacks that characterise it.

However, highlife musician, Rex Omar does not share the view that politics is a dirty game. Speaking on Daybreak Hitz on Wednesday, Rex Omar said it is rather the people involved who make it dirty.

“Who has made it a dirty game? If politics is a dirty game, then everybody is dirty because even in your house, there is politics. The people who make politics dirty are dirty people. I don’t believe that politics is a dirty game. When people have dirty minds and they come into politics, then they make it dirty,” he said.

Rex Omar who has waded into the debate of whether or not showbiz personalities should feel free to declare their stance in politics told host, KMJ that he sees nothing wrong with a musician or any showbiz personality getting involved in national politics if they so desire.

“Musicians are also nationals so we should try and differentiate between national politics and partisan politics. Ones you are a citizen, you pay taxes, utilities etc., you are part of the society. So if you love anything positive to contribute on governance, why not?” he queried.

Rex Omar added: “Any artiste who believes in what he does shouldn’t be afraid of whatever. Your thinking is your painting. If I know you have a good character and you can help the country, what is wrong with me telling the whole world that you can help?

Many celebrities have been chastised for declaring their support for political parties. Mostly, they are chided by fans who belong to a different political party and never expected that personality to launch his support for the rival. But Rex opines that celebrities should not only be respected for the works but choices.

“Ghanaians need a lot of education. Everybody who believes in a particular artiste sometimes does not necessarily respect the artiste; they love his work. You cannot at one point say you are a fan and at another side say I have made a personal decision [so you have an issue with me]. Don’t these fans have their political lineages? They have the right of choice but the artiste doesn’t? I don’t believe this is right,” he noted.

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