Unpaid Nurses Resume Strike


Unpaid Nurses Resume Strike



The during one of their strike actions

The coalition of unpaid nurses and midwives has resumed an indefinite strike over failed attempts to get their unpaid salary arrears from government.

The leadership of the group said members are undergoing a steamroller hardship following a series of failed attempts to use the humble approach to retrieve from its employer, salaries which have remained unpaid till date.

According to the coalition, “Members of the coalition who have been paid are “not more than thirty percent” and “most of the thirty percent were not paid fully.”

“To our interest, the answer to why the few 30 percent were “not paid fully” despite release of funds and clearance by the Finance Ministry is left unanswered. This cannot be related to “human error” but a deliberate deception,” they continued.


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The survey, conducted by the coalition through mailing, also revealed that out of the over 7,000 affected nurses and midwives, five percent have not been paid their salaries for 12 to 24 months and 65 percent have unpaid salary arrears ranging from four to 18 months, while 30 percent have received some form of payments.

Also, out of the thirty that government has released money for their payment, only five percent have received full payment, with 25 percent of members short paid.

The release, signed by all regional coordinators of the coalition, said they are convinced enough that “the government has not addressed our salaries and arrears issues with the necessary attention.”

“In the light of the above stated predicaments, the coalition with due respect and left with no better alternative, in no uncertain terms, declare “resumption” of its indefinite strike on “WEDNESDAY 3RD FEBRUARY 2016″ till every single dime is paid to our bank accounts,” the release said.

The coalition, a couple of months ago, suspended its nationwide strike action, in relation to the unpaid salaries and arrears following a humble response to the relevant stakeholders that their concerns will be addressed in the shortest possible time, but the new development indicates stakeholders’ failure to address the issue of unpaid salaries of nurses and midwives.

By Jamila Akweley Okertchiri


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