We are not corrupt; Gov’t challenges IEA to provide proof


The government has challenged the Institute of Economic Affairs to provide credible proof of corruption at the office of the president.

In a statement dismissing a public perception survey conducted by the IEA which named the office as the second most corrupt institution in the country, Communications Minister Edward Omane Boamah said the IEA and other institutions cannot hide behind such surveys to create the impression that corruption is getting worse in the country.

The IEA on Wednesday released content of a survey they conducted in the ten regions which named the office as the second most corrupt top ten institutions in the country.

The office came second only to the police which has traditionally been named as the most corrupt institutions in most surveys.

Of the 1,200 respondents interviewed 23 percent of them think that nearly all police officials are corrupt.

For the office of the president, 19.2 percent of the respondents think the office is equally as corrupt with tax officials and Members of Parliament receiving 15.4 and 15 percent respectively.

Others are government officials generally (13.9%) District Chief Executives (13.3%) judges and magistrates (13.1%), Assemblymen and women (11.9%) Immigration (10.4%) and the Army (7.0%).

But government is not impressed with the results of the survey.

Hours after the IEA survey was released the government issued a statement debunking assertions in the survey.

“Government strenuously rejects any such suggestion that the Office is corrupt, let alone being the second most corrupt institution in Ghana.” 

“The practice where groups or organisations purport to conduct polls and through a visceral approach publish their outcomes in a manner that seeks to create the impression of corruption does little to advance the fight against corruption”, Communications Minister Omane Boamah stated.

He said government’s track record in fighting corruption is unmatched.

“It is a matter of public record that no Government has done more to expose and punish corruption like the John Mahama administration. He noted that organisations seeking to discuss the subject need to be guided by verified facts not unfounded accusations hiding under the cover of perception,” the statement said.

Read the full statement
Re- IEA report citing   the Office of the President  

Government has rejected a report quoting the IEA as saying that the Office of the President is the second most corrupt. A statement signed by the Minister for Communications, Dr. Edward Omane Boamah said, “Government strenuously rejects any such suggestion that the Office is corrupt, let alone being the second most corrupt institution in Ghana.” 

“The practice where groups or organisations purport to conduct polls and through a visceral approach publish their outcomes in a manner that seeks to create the impression of corruption does little to advance the fight against corruption”, the Minister stated.

He therefore challenged the IEA to offer credible proof to back their claims, adding that, Government has been taking far-reaching steps including reforms in public financial administration and the establishment of tighter controls as part of efforts to address the issue of corruption. He also indicated that the IEA must bring out for verification the methodology for the so-called perception survey. 

According to Dr. Omane Boamah, it is a matter of public record that no Government has done more to expose and punish corruption like the John Mahama administration. He noted that organisations seeking to discuss the subject need to be guided by verified facts not unfounded accusations hiding under the cover of perception.

Additionally, the timing of the release of this purported survey just a day before the President presents the Stat of the Nation Address cannot be lost on the objectiveminded members of the public. 

Government, the Minister stated, will continue to focus on its transformation agenda and cherishes the continuous support of the citizenry towards the building of a Better Ghana


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