Cocaine Gang Hijacks Mission School

School authorities at the Roman Catholic Basic School Complex at Nsawam-Adoagyiri in the Eastern Region are appealing to the Inspector General of Police, Mohammed Alhassan, as a matter of urgency to come to the aid of the school whose compound has virtually been taken over by cocaine and marijuana or ‘wee’’ smokers.

The mission school temporarily suspends effective teaching and learning every afternoon as classrooms are engulfed in an avalanche of smoke exuding from the camp of the vagabonds.

Aside of that, the ‘wee smokers’ have compounded the plight of the institution by always defecating in the classrooms whenever the school closes for the day.

“It takes the effort of the pupils who are supervised by the teachers to clean the mess left by the hooligans who are making our lives a hell,” the head teacher of R/C Basic School, Roselyn Oforiwah, intimated to the Daily Heritage in an interview.

She explained that the pupils are unable to sit in class especially during the afternoon due to the smoke exuding from the marijuana smoker’s camp.

According to the head teacher, the marijuana smokers who do not care a hoot how the killer smoke they give off into the school environment affects the tender school pupils’ health have become a thorn in the flesh.

She observed that efforts by the police to flush out the hooligans have proved futile as they always take to their heels anytime the security officials storm their hideout.

The despair-stricken head teacher said “the police come in their vehicle, the moment they set their eyes on them, they run away only to return to the camp and resume frustrating us. They are always there, they never leave the place”.

Mrs. Oforiwah pointed out that passers-by who use the school’s compound as trial to their various destinations also hijack teaching and learning with the excessive noise from their motorbikes.

“School pupils, who are reeling under poor infrastructure challenges now have to further endure stealing of personal and teachers ‘property.”

“The school does not have furniture and the biggest dilemma is asking pupils to bring chairs from their homes or paring them thereby congesting the class,” she opined.

She appealed to the government and public-spirited individuals to come to their aid to help address pertinent challenges facing the deprived school.

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