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Sunday, July 3, 2022

When presidency loses trust

Array

If there is anything President John Evans Atta Mills needs, besides fixing the economy, it is the trust of the people of Ghana.

This critical ingredient, he needs more than most things at this time of his tenure. Unfortunately however, routine reports reaching him are deficient in such vital details.

He is left under the circumstances with an erroneous impression that all is well, leaving us with a naked president parading the length and breadth of the country, satisfied with what for him are convincing deliveries, the obvious contradictions notwithstanding.

It is regrettable that things are taking this direction and to the disadvantage of the Presidency, whose inability to convince most Ghanaians will cast dim its chances of achieving its set goals.

We recall with remorse, the confusion which characterized the communications machinery at the Presidency until it was re-engineered to restore something close to decency at the place.

Those were tottering days when a number of persons were engaged in spreading the Presidency’s messages, assignment which they discharged rather woefully and uncoordinatedly.

Today, the communications machinery might be wearing a new garb; but the inherent inconsistencies in messages going out to the people is exacting the same adverse effects of not convincing most people- the result of gaping contradictions.

It was only a few weeks ago when President Mills assured his representatives in the districts and municipalities that he would not kowtow to the demands of foot-soldiers to sack these officials.

Little did we know at the time that this was nothing but hot air, disappearing no sooner than it was exhaled.

This was a sweetener in the palate of embattled MCEs and DCEs, some of whom had fled their duty posts to nearby refuges when foot-soldiers’ power surged towards them.

Unfortunately for them, the President is unable to make good his word, succumbing disappointedly, tail tucked between the legs, to the pressures of foot-soldiers who are now smiling at their success.

They have really showed that they would not sit down “make dey cheat them” as propounded by founder Rawlings.

The significance of their victory is that they have come to appreciate the power they wield and would always use it when the need arises and as they deem fit.

There have been other instances of the President not being able to make good his promises, all of which nib away at his remaining credibility.

These are worrying shortcomings, and emanating from the Presidency compels us to doubt whether the First Gentleman’s “yes” can really be “yes” and “no” be “no”.

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