Govt Writes To Legon To Stop Collecting Tolls But…

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viagra generic europe The controversy over the collection of road tolls at the University of Ghana may soon come to an end, with the Ministry of Roads and Highways having requested for a dialogue with the university to work out modalities for the payment of debts incurred by the university to maintain the roads on the campus.

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The collection of the tolls is, therefore, being done to enable the authorities to pay back the loan and also help in the maintenance of the new roads.

On February 1, the university followed up on its announcement to implement a road toll scheme amid controversy.

By that arrangement, all vehicles entering the main campus and those using the road passing through the Staff Village have to pay user charges.

What the laws say

University of Ghana Act Article 16 (1) of Act 806, which deals with the powers of the University Council, states: “Subject to the provision of this act, the University Council shall have the power to do or provide for any act or thing in relation to the university which the council considers necessary or expedient in its capacity as the governing body of the university.“

Section 16 (2) states: “The conferment of particular powers on the University Council by other provisions of this act shall not be taken to limit the generality of this section.”

Section 23 (1) (a) states that the university shall have power for any purpose which the council considers necessary or expedient, or (b) for the purpose of the performance of the functions of the university, to acquire and hold movable or immovable property, sell, lease, mortgage or otherwise alienate or dispose of that property and to enter into any other transaction.

Section 24 (1) states: “The funds of the university include (a) subventions from the Government of Ghana; (b) moneys that accrue to the university in the performance of its functions, consisting of (i) fees paid by students duly registered by the university; (ii) fees, charges and dues in respect of services rendered by or through the university; (iii) proceeds from the sale of publications of the university; (iv) grants, subscriptions, rents and royalties; (c) interest from investments; (d) endowments, donations and gifts; and (e) moneys from any other source approved by the council.”
1992 Constitution

That notwithstanding, Article 174(1) (2) of the 1992 Constitution states: “No taxation shall be imposed otherwise than by or under the authority of an Act of Parliament.

“Where an act, enacted in accordance with Clause (1) of this article, confers power on any person or authority to waive or vary a tax imposed by that act, the exercise of power of waiver of variation in favour of any person or authority shall be subject to the prior approval of Parliament by resolution.”