Posted: Saturday 10th May 2014 at 13:42 pm

Cape Coast hit by floods


Twenty-six houses were flooded while property worth millions of cedis were also destroyed by rains that hit Cape Coast and its environs.

The rains, which began in the early hours of Thursday and lasted for almost the whole day, held up the activities of most people in the metropolis.

Some of the affected areas include Pedu, Siwdu, Abura, Apewosika and Eyifua.  

  Watercourses
Although the rains did not come in torrents, they flooded the affected areas because of what residents believe was illegal siting of buildings in watercourses.

When the Daily Graphic visited the affected areas yesterday, floodwaters from the houses were receding as the  occupants tried to gather their belongings.

  Worst affected
The offices of the Bureau of National Investigations (BNI) and a drinking spot around Adisadel were the most affected by the rains as the Ghana National Fire Service (GNFS) had to come to their rescue to pump out the water from their premises.

The Central Regional Director of the National Disaster Management Organisation (NADMO), Mr Emmanuel Sandy Amartey, told the Daily Graphic that the situation was under control.

Mr Amartey indicated that the running water forced its way through the ground floor of the BNI office and the drinking spot as a result of a fuel station which had blocked the watercourse.

He said the culverts used in constructing the bridge were small, thus forcing the water to spill over.

Removal of silt
Mr Amartey appealed to the people to clear the gutters in the area of silt and also avoid throwing garbage into them in order to avoid floods.

He also appealed to the assemblies to release funds to the organisation to prepare towards the rainy season to avoid the usual catastrophe associated with rainfall in the region.

  Residents
Some of the residents blamed the city authorities for the perennial flooding in the metropolis.

They accused the authorities of indiscriminately issuing building permit to individuals to build in watercourses for a pittance “at the cost of our lives”.

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