Posted: Monday 11th August 2014 at 14:30 pm

Abrewa Nana Back With ‘Hope’

Proud to be the only lady musician featured in the Book of Hiplife by VVIP; Abrewa Nana was the Queen of GH Dancehall way back 2002 with her hit song, ‘Odo filla’.

She went missing on the music scene couple of years ago and has returned with 2 singles titled ‘No-Money-No-Honey’ and ‘A.D.J.O.A-Ninja’ which describes a girl who has rather chosen to lay with men who lie to help her become a superstar instead of working hard; all released on radio and social media last year.

Speaking to Dorcas Opoku Dakwa, Abrewa Nana told GhanaWeb Entertainment that both online released songs are on her pending (no.) album dubbed ‘Hope’ to encourage the poor, the sick, the orphan, the ‘almost-giving up’ persons and even the rich.

“I titled this album, ‘Hope’ because we all need it to survive. We all desire hope toto live hopefully to see another day and to look at the era of generation that comes with so many challenges and doubts of possibilities,” she said.

She further noted that the idea is to encourage and inspire every being especially the youth who are so easily wooed to follow almost everything their ears and eyes sees which either encourage or make them want to give up.

But “songs on my ‘Hope’ album will encourage them to flee the give-up whisper and ‘all hope is lost’ mentality from their minds and rather have the ‘Hope’ of seeing their dreams manifest.”

According to her, the upcoming album is a 15-track album which was specially written and arranged by her and was produced by Kaywa, Morris Baby Face, MixMasta Garzy as well as upcoming talented engineers, X-Conzy and Fita of Alqaheeda fame who was nominated at the 2014 VGMA.

“I featured Pros on songs on the album like Okyeame Kwame, the Rap Doctor on ‘Prince Charming’ and also, Castro, Joe Frazer, among others that I would like to keep as a surprise for now but I believe the songs on the album will ‘HIT’ bangers,” she hinted.

Meanwhile, Abrewa Nana is currently in the studio working with legend producer, Zap Mallet and also intends working with Appietus among other Ghanaian and international producers.

Far from music, the Dancehall Queen is also working on a Breast Cancer project as a “quota of my Social responsibility to educate women in the entire nation and to likewise let the public know that it’s not a disease of only women.

But also men has a high risk of being affected as well as winning babies as proven by research,” she disclosed.

“I am indeed grateful to the Lord Almighty for how far He has brought me and thank you to all Ghanaian DJs and Presenters who has appreciated my music and given me respectable air time on their various platforms for the world to hear my voice and works again not forgetting my fans and every music lovers,” she said.

Follow Abrewa Nana on Twitter, @AbrewaNa9; Instagram on @Abrewa-Nana and Facebook Abrewa Nana and like my Fan Page as well.

Musical background

Abrewa Nana became a favourite among radio DJs, and her collaboration with Sass Squad ‘Tuma’ received huge airplay.

However, it was her first album, ‘Sagoa’, in 2000 that launched her to national fame, and she earned three nominations at the Ghana Music Awards for Female Artiste of the Year, Rap Song of the Year and New Artiste of the Year.

In 2001, Abrewa Nana won an award for Hiplife Song of the Year and was named Best Female Vocalist in 2002.

The same year, Abrewa Nana released her second album, ‘African Girl’, to critical acclaim, and in 2003, she was named Best Female Artiste of the Year at the Ghana Music Awards UK. Her third album, ‘Maba’, followed in 2004, and she is currently working on a new album.

Abrewa Nana is also a dancer and famous for her heavily choreographed videos. She has worked with artistes including Samini,

In 2007, it was announced that she would be a judge on ‘Idols West Africa’, alongside the Nigerian Dede Mabiaku and the American Dan Foster; at twenty-seven, she was one of the youngest judges in Idols’ history.

Although the producers of the show were determined to portray her as the ‘nice one’, Abrewa Nana was determined to ‘be myself’.

The show was a rating success and made Nana popular outside Ghana. Apart from being the only female judge, she was well known for her catchphrase, “It doesn’t work for me.”

+