Don’t Blame Me For Nana’s 2012 Defeat – Alan K

Don’t Blame Me For Nana’s 2012 Defeat – Alan K

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Mr. Alan Kwadwo Kyerematen, a leading member of the New Patriotic Party (NPP) has denied that he was not responsible for the defeat of the party’s 2012 flagbearer, Nana Akufo-Addo.

In a 12-page interview in the current issues of the Africawatch magazine, Mr. Kyerematen was asked:

Q: As you mentioned, some comments have been made to the effect that you did not help the NPP presidential candidate and the party in the 2012 campaign. What do you say about this?

Popularly known as Alan K, he responded:

A: These comments are not only false but they are vicious and frivolous and are calculated to undermine my credibility in the party.

Those who have spearheaded this propaganda campaign obviously have a negative agenda that they are pursuing, which is counterproductive to the interest of our party, and the least said about that the better.

Below are excerpts from the interview.

Q: What is your general reflection on the conduct of the elections for new party officials in the NPP over the last few months?

A: The litmus test for the quality of organization and administrative competence in any political party lies first in the efficiency and effectiveness of the process of electing party officials. In this regard, our party has every reason to be happy of what it has achieved so far in organizing what is considered by independent and objective political analyst to be free, and transparent elections to select party officials at the polling station, constituency, regional and national levels.

Having set such a high standard of performance, I have absolutely no doubt in my mind that the impending election of a flagbearer for our party and the selection of parliamentary candidates will follow the same trend. This record hopefully will not be undermined, but rather reinforced.

This assessment is made against the backdrop that the composition of our party’s current Electoral College and the processes for internal elections could be considered as one of the most comprehensive and broad-based political models to have been introduced not only in the political history of Ghana but the whole of Africa.

The grassroots operatives in the NPP have been given a voice and are actively involved in the process of electing their own leaders. This is a clear reflection and testimony of the resilience of structures in the party, whether it is in government or not, as well as the commitment of the party to internal democratic governance.

Q: What is your assessment or the mood of the party after the National Delegates Conference held in Tamale on April 12?

A: I believe that the party has come out of the conference more united than ever before. It was the party that eventually emerged as the winner – not individual contestants. But this did not happen by chance. Party officials and other accredited delegates to the conference, jointly and separately, conducted themselves both in speech and action in a manner that did not prejudice the outcome of the elections.

The contest turned out to be about selecting candidates who can organize and manage the party to restore it to power in 2016, rather than serving the parochial interests of individuals and interest groups within the party. Going forward, the focus must be on building a strong, united party with a common purpose and vision.

Talking about unity must not be a mere rhetorical exercise undertaken by party leaders and other officials, but must be backed by concrete action. Reports in the media may seem to suggest mounting tension within the party ahead of the impending flagbearership contest, but I believe this has been unduly heightened by the media.

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